Flavor of Pueblo

Home to the Finest Food Anywhere

Courtesy Kevin Litwin, Images Magazine

Pueblo is rich in culture, and our foods reflect that richness. The Hispanic, Italian and Slovenian cultures of Pueblo influence foods found here that can't be found elsewhere. We boast that the Mirasol chile grown here is by far the most flavorful chile in the world, and our menus use it widely. In fact, Pueblo has been featured hundreds of times in numerous publications, documenting the unique flavors of our community.

Recently, the Travel Channel featured a showdown between two local Pueblo restaurants, famous for their green chile sloppers. Invented here in Pueblo, the slopper pairs our green chile with an open-faced cheeseburger and makes your mouth sizzle with pleasure.

Visiting Pueblo? Short on Time?

You have 36 hours in Pueblo, and you’re hungry. Where do you eat?

Rod Slyhoff has suggestions. The president and CEO of the Greater Pueblo Chamber of Commerce enjoys good food and the occasional martini, and can recommend some of the best places for both.

“So you get into town one evening, and from the Marriott hotel you can easily walk two blocks to a place on Main Street called Fifteen Twentyone,” he says. “Let me first mention that they have excellent martinis.”

Slyhoff suggests starting a meal at Fifteen Twentyone with mussels steamed in garlic and white wine broth, followed with a tomato salad with baby spinach, olive oil and balsamic vinaigrette.

“For the entrée, I’d go with the grilled salmon served with corn ragout and roasted red onion relish. It’s incredible.”

Enjoy an evening at one of Pueblos many nightspots. The next morning, Slyhoff would head to his favorite coffee shop – Solar Roast on Main Street – to order a dark coffee or a cappuccino drizzled with caramel and whipped cream.

“I always get a toasted bagel topped with ham, cheese and egg to complement Solar Roast’s excellent coffee.”

Work up an appetite strolling the Riverwalk, then for lunch, Rod suggests Mexican food.

“You know, you can’t come to Pueblo without getting a plate of Mexican food, and I always rave about Mexi-Deli on Abriendo Avenue,” he says. “They have good chips and salsa and cold Mexican beer while you look over the menu, and their house specialty is a taco Azteca. It’s a flat taco shell filled with sour cream, guacamole, lettuce, tomato and cheese, then smothered with green chile. It’s the best.”

Spend the afternoon visiting the galleries and museums Pueblo has to offer. That night for dinner, Slyhoff would frequent Park East Restaurant on Goodnight Avenue. He likes to sit at the bar because it offers a lively atmosphere, with bands performing several nights a week.

“For my dinner, I prefer the garlic spicy shrimp followed by some prosciutto-wrapped asparagus, then a steak bruschetta topped with blue cheese,” he says. “Plus I can never pass up the calamari at Park East, and I also enjoy a glass of Toasted Head merlot to accompany my meal.”

The next morning, Slyhoff says he would probably skip breakfast – maybe just grab a cup of coffee and then go do some things. But at 10:30 a.m., an iconic restaurant called Pass Key opens.

“For lunch there, you should try an Italian sausage sandwich they call the Pass Key Special – but be sure to upgrade to the Super Pass Key Special,” he says. "The owners buy their sausage from the same market they’ve used for decades, then mix in their own secret spices before grilling it to perfection.”

The sausage is then topped with three different cheeses – American, Swiss and provolone – and it all goes on a toasted bun.

“That is one of the most outstanding sandwiches you could ever imagine,” Rod says. “It’s the perfect way to wrap up 36 hours of culinary adventure in Pueblo. So have a safe trip home and the next time you’re in town, give me a call and hopefully I can join you for a meal.”