Activities

Fun things to do in and around Pueblo

Blessed with water, sunshine and fertile soil, St. Charles Mesa was settled in the late 1800s/early 1900s by mostly Italian immigrants. These families continue to farm the land of their ancestors with world-famous Mira Sol chiles and lots of other farm-fresh wonders. During the growing and harvest seasons, people can visit farms to buy produce and even pick their own.

The building at this location is the only remaining firehouse in Pueblo that housed horse-drawn fire equipment and one of two remaining that has the famous brass pole still intact. It was “home” to the valiant men who served with the distinguished Hose Company No. 3. The building was erected in 1881 and the last fire alarm was sounded on March 9, 1979. The building continues its fire-related service to the community through the backing of a fire museum. A wealth of information and pictures, as well as antique fire engines, hose carts and other memorabilia are on display.  

The Pueblo Railway Museum is a program of the Pueblo Railway Foundation ("PRF"). The mission is historic preservation of railroad equipment and history. The ultimate goal is to promote and foster an interest in railroading, the study and preservation of railroad history, the impact of the railroad on the history of Pueblo and the growth of the United States and related subjects for the education and satisfaction of all.

There is something for every type of mountain biker in the Pueblo area. From the beginner to the expert, you can find just about any type of trail in the 70 miles of trails immediately surrounding Pueblo.

One of America’s castles, the Rosemount Museum was once the house of the Thatcher Family – one of Pueblo’s founding families. The 37-room home is made of Colorado pink volcanic stone and was designed by Victorian architect Henry Hudson Holly of New York City.

The Pueblo Chile has slowly grown from a local favorite into a phenomenon that attracts chili aficionados from around the world. Visitors to Pueblo make it a point to find sellers of the little green delights, and make sure they have enough to last throughout the year. Now, a new trend in tourism has emerged in Pueblo. The Pueblo Chile is now not only a culinary staple, but an industry that draws adventurers looking for “alternative forms of tourism” from every corner of the planet. Lovers of the Pueblo Chile can now experience it in a whole new way, and experience it at its source in a growing tourism trend known as “Agritourism.”

The Southeastern Colorado Heritage Center and Museum (SCHCM) seeks to preserve, promote, and interpret the heritage of Southeastern Colorado, thereby fostering an understanding and appreciation for the plurality of its people.

Just one hour east of Pueblo sits Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site, a reconstructed 1840’s adobe fur trading post on the mountain branch of the Santa Fe Trail where traders, trappers, travelers and Plains Indian tribes came together in peaceful terms for trade. Today, living historians recreate the sights, sounds and smells of the past with guided tours, demonstrations, and special events.

Searching for a new place to visit? A locale that is: Creative. Historic. Artistic. Look to Pueblo's Creative Corridor!  There’s plenty to explore in Pueblo’s Creative Corridor. Art. Music. Dance. Over an easily navigated area, the Corridor is packed with galleries, museums, street sculptures and fountains, cafés and live music—all ready to challenge your imagination and inspire your visit. 

With seven rotating galleries, the Sangre de Cristo Arts Center is a must-see stop for art lovers. The Arts Center boasts several art collections that embody the American Southwest, including: the King Collection of Western Art, the world’s largest repository of work by Printmaker Gene Kloss, and a growing collection of historic and contemporary Santos and Retablos.

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