Fun things to do in and around Pueblo

Pueblo is teeming with unique locations and authentic experiences. And, while it might take more than one trip to Pueblo, here are several Pueblo places that you must see!

The Pueblo Railway Museum is a program of the Pueblo Railway Foundation ("PRF"). The mission is historic preservation of railroad equipment and history. The ultimate goal is to promote and foster an interest in railroading, the study and preservation of railroad history, the impact of the railroad on the history of Pueblo and the growth of the United States and related subjects for the education and satisfaction of all.

Once considered Pueblo’s Red-Light District, this historically significant shopping area boasts 83 buildings on the National Historic Register. With the Historic Union Depot on one end and the Historic Riverwalk on the other, this District is perfect for strolling, gallery hopping, shopping, or eating ice cream and cupcakes.

The Arkansas River levee is the canvas for the Pueblo Levee Mural Project‚ a 3-mile-long piece of artwork that holds the Guinness Book of World Records’ distinction as being the world’s largest continuous painting. Not bad for some­thing that began 30 years ago as isolated graffiti and was not embraced by the community at large.  

Where else in Colorado can you ride a roller coaster for a quarter and visit an African Lion? The Pueblo City Park offers a year-round zoo filled with more than 400 animals and beautiful native-plant gardens. The City Park Rides are open all summer, and rides cost only a quarter. The historic carousel is original to the Park, recently restored and worthwhile nostalgic trip.

This nationally top-ranked Children’s Museum in the country is a high-energy, interactive, artistic adventure. With tons of hands-on activities and the Baby Buell Barn, kids of all ages (and adults, too!) will be entertained until exhaustion.

The Nature & Raptor Center of Pueblo is located in beautiful Rock Canyon on the banks of the Arkansas River. A delicate blend of aquatic, riparian, transition and semi-arid grassland habitats provide homes to a wealth of plants and animals. Dine in style at the restaurant overlooking the Arkansas River, enjoy an educational talk and demonstration about birds of prey, and bike along the extensive river trail network.

Blessed with water, sunshine and fertile soil, St. Charles Mesa was settled in the late 1800s/early 1900s by mostly Italian immigrants. These families continue to farm the land of their ancestors with world-famous Mira Sol chiles and lots of other farm-fresh wonders. During the growing and harvest seasons, people can visit farms to buy produce and even pick their own.

Dine, stroll or enjoy a boat or gondola ride along this river-inspired park. After a devastating flood in 1921, the Arkansas River was diverted to a different location. The Historic Arkansas Riverwalk commemorates the river’s original location with history, public art, interactive fountains, and great events. The international headquarters for the Professional Bull Riders Association also saddles up along the Riverwalk.

With seven rotating galleries, the Sangre de Cristo Arts Center is a must-see stop for art lovers. The Arts Center boasts several art collections that embody the American Southwest, including: the King Collection of Western Art, the world’s largest repository of work by Printmaker Gene Kloss, and a growing collection of historic and contemporary Santos and Retablos.

This amazing one-man-made castle is part artistry, part craftsmanship and part entertainment. Nestled right along the edge of the San Isabel National Forest, the castle is still a work-in-progress – created only with the heavy labor of artisan Jim Bishop. Bishop is also well-known for his hand-painted signs and spontaneous soliloquies.

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